>Seven Questions With Mickie B. Ashling

>Loving Edits
By Mickie B. Ashling
Paperback & eBook, Dreamspinner Press, June 14, 2010

Let’s start with the basics: what’s your new book about, and how can readers get their hands on it?

My latest novel is a m/m/m romance about three men in crisis. Don’t let the blurb scare you [full blurb on the Dreamspinner website].

Loving Edits celebrates the joys and sorrows of true love while exploring the human spirit. When bestselling novelist Mick Henley contacts his editor and former lover, Paul Alcott, after a seven-year absence, hearing Mick’s voice reinforces what Paul has known all along—he still loves Mick—but his hopes are dashed when he learns Mick is in a loving relationship with Tono Garat. Mick soon reveals he’s been diagnosed with a fatal disease, and Paul and Tono must figure out if they can overcome their differences to provide the loving support necessary to sustain the man they love.

How did you get started writing fiction?

I had a mother who was a voracious reader. She always had a book in her hand, and it was a natural thing for me to gravitate toward her favorite pastime. English and literature were favorite subjects in school, and my vivid imagination just made for a great combination.

How much time do you spend writing—by the day, week, month, however you define it?

I write every day from 3:00 A.M. to 5:30 A.M. Then I get ready for my day job. I never take a break from my schedule, even when I’m on vacation. If nothing new comes to mind, I edit. I’m one of those lucky people who can survive on five hours of sleep.

What’s the most challenging part of the writing process for you?

Finding the perfect words for what I want to say. For instance, it’s always difficult to come up with fresh and different ways to describe a sex scene. There are certain key words that are used to death in this genre (m/m), and I find it challenging to come up with variations of the same.

What comes easiest?

Plotting. I never seem to run out of ideas. Having four sons is very helpful when you’re writing about men. Our conversations usually start with my question and their reply which goes like this. “Eww, don’t ask me that” or “Promise you won’t put this in a book” or “You want to know how to say WHAT in a different way?” It’s always fun to hear the shock, followed by the burst of laughter. I’m amazed I get anything done, but I must say that they have been very helpful with all the ick questions I throw at them.

How do you write, physically speaking? Longhand, laptop, desktop, inside or out, at a desk, comfy chair, in bed?

I use a desktop when I’m at home and a laptop when I’m traveling. I never write in longhand anymore. I can’t write as fast as I create, and it’s frustrating , not to mention difficult, to read my own scribble once I get done. I love computers. They’ve made a huge difference in the way I write. There’s nothing more exciting to me than filling up a blank screen.

Do you write just one story at time, or do you usually have several works in progress?

One at a time. I can’t move on to the next project until the one I’m working on is completed, edited, and submitted. Even after that, I’m on tenterhooks until I get word that it’s under contract. Then I can relax and start on a new story.

What are your long-term goals as a writer?

Quitting my day job is something I dream about. I want to have more time to write, so I’m working toward that goal. As for the actual writing, I enjoy reading historical fiction but have never attempted that genre. I’d love to try my hand at it someday. And who doesn’t dream of the movie deal? That’s the ultimate fantasy for a writer, isn’t it?

Find Mickie on LiveJournal and at her website.

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